Level Nine Sports
 

 advertise with indeep media

Murdoch, The Dirty Digger

Posted: July 15th, 2011 | Author: | Filed under: Favorite New Thought . . ., Michael Courtenay, They Said What | Tags: , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on Murdoch, The Dirty Digger

Murdoch is set to sell more newspapers as his – NewsCorp – criminal antics make front pages, Newscorp papers cannibalize their own bad news!?

There’s much chatter among doomsayers, the  paranoid blogsphere is alight with rants of Murdoch’s  immanent downfall. Murdoch’s current woes in the U.K. have the interweb abuzz with  speculation of the moguls undoing thanks to curruption in his U.K. publications Lets back this up a couple of feet.

News Corp’s newspaper operations in the U.S., UK, and Australia combined make up only 10% of the company’s business. If anything Murdoch’s newspapers have relied on scandal to sell papers, Newscorp may simply cannibalize it’s own bad news to sell newspapers!?

Of greater danger is news  emerging that News of the World staff paid police officers in the UK in the course of their phone-hacking adventures.

In a letter co-penned by Holder and Mary L. Schapiro the duo are pursuing charges that employees of Mr Murdoch’s News Corporation – a U.S. based company – had bribed British police as part of the hacking scandal, saying that it could violate a U.S. law, the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act ::::

Murdoch cleverly defended his company’s handling of the phone-hacking scandal in Britain via his very own Wall Street Journal

As if Murdoch needed more publicity to increase circulation, even publications who would in an older wiser world have stayed away from the bluster have chimed in.  Forbes is running an amusing, if not slightly hysterical headline ‘Want proof that the shock waves from the News of the World phone hacking scandal have crossed the Atlantic? It’s Time magazine’s cover story. It’s the third time Rupert Murdoch has appeared on the weekly’s cover. The last two were under somewhat more auspicious circumstances: In 1977, when he was first making his presence felt in the U.S. with his recent purchases of the New York Post and New York magazine’ www.time.com

News Corp chairman and chief executive Rupert Murdoch cleverly defended his company’s handling of the phone-hacking scandal in Britain via his very own Wall Street Journal. In an interview with the Wall Street Journal, Murdoch voiced his confidence that News Corp world survive the current termoil,  and outlined an independent committee led by a “distinguished non-employee” who would “investigate every charge of improper conduct” made against News Corp. 80-year-old Murdoch said the damage to News Corp in Britain, where it was forced to close down the News of the World because of the phone hacking, is “nothing that will not be recovered”. “We have a reputation of great, good works in this country,” he said. Murdoch, in what the newspaper described as his first significant public comment since the scandal, said News Corp has handled the crisis “extremely well in every way possible”, making just “minor mistakes”. Murdoch told that Journal that the position of his son, James, the deputy chief operating officer of News Corp and non-executive chairman of British satellite TV broadcaster BSkyB, is unchanged. The mobile phone hacking allegedly ended before James became the top News Corp executive in charge of the News of the World but he has been the one largely managing the crisis.

Statement from Rupert Murdoch, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, News Corporation: London, 6 July, 2011 – Recent allegations of phone hacking and making payments to police with respect to the News of the World are deplorable and unacceptable. I have made clear that our company must fully and proactively cooperate with the police in all investigations and that is exactly what News International has been doing and will continue to do under Rebekah Brooks’ leadership. We are committed to addressing these issues fully and have taken a number of important steps to prevent them from happening again. I have also appointed Joel Klein to provide important oversight and guidance and Joel and Viet Dinh, an Independent Director, are keeping News Corporation’s Board fully advised as well.

For Newscorp, the only negative fallout so far from the U.K. hacking has been News Corp’s forced withdrawal for full control of BSkyB and a 3 percent share price drop. It’s more likely than not that Newscorp will simply bide time, re-visiting the takeover in the not so distant future and if history has any say the share price will rise as likely fall. In fact, the U.K. hacking scandal is more likely a blessing for Newscorp, allowing it an exit from papers that have seldom turned a profit. Investors have been itching for News Corp to ditch its newspaper endeavors, which, while close to Murdoch’s heart, offer little in the way of growth. As for BSkyB, if Newscorp were forced to sell off? it would simply liquidize $8 billion dollars to cash, not an unfortunate outcome, and one surely smiled on by investors.

There are of course serious implications should Newscorp be found to have played similar hacking games in the U.S.A. Though it seems unlikely to have happened as journalists in the U.S. have carte blanche access to private records – British privacy laws are notoriously strict – it is unlikely the same culture of anything-to-get-the-news has been adopted by Murdoch’s U.S. journalists. The U.S. danger for Murdoch is of course the paranoid nature of the U.S. itself. No American citizen wants to see 9/11 victims victimized by a media mogul, least of all a foreign media mogul. Claims that Murdoch journalists attempted to get hold of victims’ phone details was made by the Mirror newspaper, which based the story on an unnamed source, a former New York police officer working as a private detective, who was said to have been approached by News of the World reporters asking him to retrieve the private phone records of the dead. The announcement of an FBI inquiry into Newscorps  followed a mounting chorus from politicians and relatives of 9/11 victims calling for a review of the allegations. Peter King, the Republican chairman of the homeland security committee in the House of Representatives, on Wednesday wrote to the director of the FBI, Robert Mueller, and asked him to open an investigation into the 9/11 allegations. Even if the information contained in the Mirror article were to be verified, there are serious legal problems with prosecuting such an investigation. The events were so long ago that prosecution under U.S. wiretapping laws is subject to a five-year statute of limitations.

Of greater danger is news  emerging that News of the World staff paid police officers in the UK in the course of their phone-hacking adventures. Vocal U.S. Democratic senator Jay Rockefeller has been loudly pressuring U.S. Attorney-General, Eric Holder to scower over any U.S. laws that may have been been broken. In a letter co-penned by Jay Rockefeller and Mary L. Schapiro – U.S. Senator and Chairwoman of the Securities and Exchange Commission – the duo wrote: “The reported allegations against News Corporation are very serious, indicate a pattern of illegal activity, and involve thousands of potential victims . . . It is important to ensure that no United States laws were broken and no United States citizens were victimized”  The duo also pointed to charges that employees of Mr Murdoch’s News Corporation – a U.S. based company – had bribed British police as part of the hacking scandal, saying that it could violate a U.S. law, the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act.

picture via graziano origa

Source:

OutFoxed: Rupert Murdoch’s War on Journalism


OutFoxed: 

Outfoxed: Rupert Murdoch’s War on Journalism is a 2004 documentary film by filmmaker Robert Greenwald that criticises the Fox News Channel, and its owner, Rupert Murdoch, claiming that the channel is used to promote and advocateright-wing views. The film says this pervasive bias contradicts the channel’s claim of being “Fair and Balanced”, and argues that Fox News has been engaging in what amounts to consumer fraud.

The documentary was not released theatrically, but rather was distributed in DVD format by the Political action committeeMoveOn.org, and sold online through Internet retailers such as Amazon.com, where it was a top-seller in July 2004.[1]MoveOn.org had helped promote the DVD release by taking out a full-page advertisement in The New York Times.[1]

Assertions

The film examines the global growth of Murdoch’s media enterprise in the context of concentration of media ownershipconsiderations, and evaluates the effect of having one person in control of a large media conglomerate on freedom of the pressOutfoxed’s analysis includes:

  • Review of Fox News’ coverage during the lead-up to, and the aftermath of, the 2003 invasion of Iraq.
  • Interviews with former Fox News journalists, exposing incidents where Fox News asked journalists to lie, and when they refused, they were fired. When the reporters sued Fox in court, providing proof of their claim, the court ruled that there is no current law against lying on a news program.
  • Instances where Fox News commentators such as Bill O’Reilly and Sean Hannity attempt to intimidate guests with whom they disagree, such as author and activistJeremy Glick.
  • Studies which evidence more airtime and coverage is consistently given to Republican politicians, particularly those in the George W. Bush administration, than toDemocrats.
  • Inspection of whether Fox News’ premature result-calling of the 2000 presidential election contributed to George W. Bush officially being elected,
  • Scrutiny over Fox News management, including Murdoch and president Roger Ailes, both conservatives, in controlling the network’s content, and editorial control from Murdoch down ensuring which stories and issues are covered and the strongly conservative perspective of such coverage,
  • Discussion of suspensions and other reprisals meted out to reporters and producers for not promoting the channel’s political point of view.
  • Highlights of Fox News tendency to pick strong confident, conservatives and weak-looking complacent liberals to appear on it.

Former Fox News journalists appear in the film critiquing the methods and perceived integrity of their former employer. For example, Jon Du Pre, a former reporter for Fox News’ West Coast bureau, said that he had been suspended by Fox News management because his live shots from the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library on Ronald Reagan‘s birthday — which Du Pre described was like a “holy day” to Fox News’ hierarchy — were not “celebratory enough.”[2] A former Fox News military contributor, Larry C. Johnson, also claimed that he was in high demand to give on-air analysis on the “War on Terrorism“, until he called into question on Hannity & Colmes whether or not the United States could fight two wars (in Afghanistan and Iraq) simultaneously, an incident after which Johnson says he was promptly ignored as a potential Fox News contributor.[3]

Participants

  • Robert W. McChesney, Founder of Free Press/ Author of “The Problem of the Media”
  • Jeff Cohen, Former MSNBC/Fox News Contributor
  • David Brock, President/CEO of Media Matters for America
  • Gene Kimmelman, Sr. Dir. of the Public Policy & Advocacy Consumers Union
  • Frank O’Donnell, Former Fox News Producer, Washington DC
  • Dave Burnett, Former Fox News Reporter, Washington DC
  • Diana Winthrop, Former Fox News Producer
  • Walter Cronkite, Former CBS Evening News Anchor
  • Larry C. Johnson, Former Fox News Contributor
  • Jon Du Pre, Former Fox News Anchor-West Coast Bureau
  • Clara Frenk, Former Fox News Producer
  • Dave Korb, Former Freelance Fox News Writer
  • Av Westin, Former Vice President of ABC News
  • David Hnatiuk, Former Fox Music Supervisor
  • James Wolcott, Former Staff Writer for the New Yorker/Cultural Critic for Vanity Fair
  • Peter Hart, Media Analyst for FAIR (Fairness & Accuracy in Reporting)
  • Steve Rendall, Senior Analyst, FAIR (Fairness & Accuracy in Reporting)
  • Rep. Bernie Sanders, Independent Congressman from VT since 1991
  • Joseph A. Cafasso, Former Fox News Military & Counter-terrorism Editor
  • Al Franken, Air America Host
  • Jeremy Glick
  • Eric Alterman, Media Critic, Author of “What Liberal Media?”
  • John Nichols, Author of “Dick: The Man Who Is President”
  • Chellie Pigree, President of Common Cause
  • Jeff Chester, Exec. Dir. of Center for Digital Democracy
  • Alexander Kippen, Former Fox News Reporter, Washington DC
  • Larry Irving, Former Asst. Sec. of Commerce for Communications & Information
  • Len Hill, Independent Producer
  • Malkia Cyril, Exec. Dir. of Media Youth Council
  • David Goodfriend, Founder of Air America Radio
  • Wally Bowen, Founder and Exec. Dir. of the Mountain Area Information Network

Official News Corporation Press Releases

Statement from Rupert Murdoch, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, News Corporation: London, 6 July, 2011  Recent allegations of phone hacking and making payments to police with respect to the News of the World are deplorable and unacceptable. I have made clear that our company must fully and proactively cooperate with the police in all investigations and that is exactly what News International has been doing and will continue to do under Rebekah Brooks’ leadership. We are committed to addressing these issues fully and have taken a number of important steps to prevent them from happening again. I have also appointed Joel Klein to provide important oversight and guidance and Joel and Viet Dinh, an Independent Director, are keeping News Corporation’s Board fully advised as well.

News Corporation (NASDAQ: NWS, NWSA; ASX: NWS, NWSLV) had total assets as of March 31, 2011 of approximately US$60 billion and total annual revenues of approximately US$33 billion. News Corporation is a diversified global media company with operations in six industry segments: cable network programming; filmed entertainment; television; direct broadcast satellite television; publishing; and other. The activities of News Corporation are conducted principally in the United States, Continental Europe, the United Kingdom, Australia, Asia and Latin America.

Rupert Murdoch: http://www.newscorp.com/news/news_491.html

—————————————————–

A Message from James Murdoch on Issues at News International: 15 July 2011, I am writing to update you on the actions we have been taking as a Company to solve the problems at News International relating to the News of the World, in addition to continuing to cooperate fully and actively with the police and settling civil claims.

  • Earlier today, Rebekah Brooks resigned from her position as CEO. I understand her decision and I want to thank her for her 22 years of service to the Company. She has been one of the outstanding editors of her generation and she can be proud of many accomplishments as an executive. We support her as she takes this step to clear her name;
  • We have created an independent Management & Standards Committee and I want to emphasise its importance. The Committee has direct governance and oversight from News Corporation Board members and is codifying standards that will be clear and enforced;
  • We made the difficult and necessary decision to close the News of the World;
  • A number of other executives have now left the Company;
  • News Corporation also withdrew its proposal to acquire the shares in BSkyB it does not own. This is a strong signal that our top priority in the UK is to address the issues facing News International.

Looking to the future, I am also pleased to tell you that Tom Mockridge will become CEO of News International. Tom is in London today and will start right away. Tom is a highly respected and accomplished media executive who has served as CEO of Sky Italia since its launch in 2003. Tom, who has also been in charge of our European Television business, started his career as a newspaper journalist in New Zealand and he has held a range of top roles in the newspaper industry. The creation of TG-24, Italy’s only truly independent 24 hours news channel, is a credit to Tom’s leadership and integrity.

This weekend, News International will run advertisements in all national newspapers. We will apologise to the nation for what has happened. We will follow this up in the future with communications about the actions we have taken to address the wrongdoing that occurred.

We are also sending letters to our commercial partners with an update on the actions we are taking.

Next week, my father and I will appear before the CMS Select Committee and will speak to them directly about our determination to put things right.

The Company has made mistakes. It is not only receiving appropriate scrutiny, but is also responding to unfair attacks by setting the record straight.

I would like to conclude by saying thank you. Throughout this time, you have gotten out great papers every day and have stayed focused. I am deeply grateful for that.

James Murdoch. http://www.newscorp.com/news/news_496.html

—————————————————–

A Note from Rupert Murdoch Regarding the Resignation of Les Hinton: 15 July, 2011

To Dow Jones employees,

You will have just heard that I, with the heaviest of hearts, have accepted the resignation of Les Hinton. It is a measure of his integrity and the quality of his character that he felt compelled to take responsibility even though he is far from the serious issues in London.

Les and I have been on a remarkable journey together for more than 52 years. That this passage has come to an unexpected end, professionally, not personally, is a matter of much sadness to me. I vividly recall an enthusiastic young man in the offices of my first newspaper in Adelaide, where Les joined the company as a 15-year-old and had the rather unenviable task of buying me sandwiches for lunch.

It was clear then that Les was a remarkable talent, and that he had the ability and the energy to carry him far. Little did we both realize that we would be travel companions on a journey through the world of magazines, Hollywood, television studios, coupons and the greatest newspapers on the globe. Little did we realize that our corporate relationship would end in these circumstances.

Through all of his many jobs he has displayed leadership – and that leadership has enabled us to make remarkable progress at the Dow Jones company while our competitors have been flailing because of structural change and economic crisis.

Three and a half years ago, when I stood atop boxes of photocopy paper in the rather dowdy offices of the old Dow Jones, there was no doubt some apprehension among the staff about the new management. No amount of reassurance or cajoling can convince a person to respect another – respect only comes through the reality of day-after-day contact. Respect is earned not granted. Les has earned the respect of all at Dow Jones, both for the way he conducts himself and for the way he has conducted the company.

On this difficult day we should appreciate that his extraordinary work has provided a platform for the future success of Dow Jones. And his great contribution to News Corporation over more than five decades has enhanced innumerable lives, whether those of employees hired by him or of readers better informed because of him.

Let me emphasize one point – News Corporation is not Rupert Murdoch. It is the collective creativity and effort of many thousands of people around the world, and few individuals have given more to this company than Les Hinton.

Rupert Murdoch: http://www.newscorp.com/news/news_498.html

—————————————————–

Les Hinton, Chief Executive Officer of Dow Jones & Company and Publisher of The Wall Street Journal Resigns from Company

New York, NY, July 15, 2011 – News Corporation today announced the resignation of Les Hinton, Chief Executive Officer of Dow Jones & Company and Publisher of The Wall Street Journal, effective immediately. Mr. Hinton, a 52-year veteran of News Corporation, has led Dow Jones since December, 2007.

“Les and I have been on a remarkable journey together for more than 52 years. That this passage has come to an unexpected end, professionally, not personally, is a matter of much sadness to me,” commented Rupert Murdoch, Chairman and CEO of News Corporation. “On this difficult day we should appreciate that his extraordinary work has provided a platform for the future success of Dow Jones. And his great contribution to News Corporation over more than five decades has enhanced innumerable lives, whether those of employees hired by him or of readers better informed because of him. News Corporation is not Rupert Murdoch. It is the collective creativity and effort of many thousands of people around the world, and few individuals have given more to this Company than Les Hinton.”

Mr. Hinton commented, “I have watched with sorrow from New York as the News of the World story has unfolded. I have seen hundreds of news reports of both actual and alleged misconduct during the time I was executive chairman of News International and responsible for the company. The pain caused to innocent people is unimaginable. That I was ignorant of what apparently happened is irrelevant and in the circumstances I feel it is proper for me to resign from News Corp. and apologize to those hurt by the actions of News of the World.”

“When I left News International in December 2007, I believed that the rotten element at the News of the World had been eliminated; that important lessons had been learned; and that journalistic integrity was restored,” he continued. “My testimonies before the Culture Media and Sport Select Committee were given honestly. When I appeared before the Committee in March 2007, I expressed the belief that Clive Goodman had acted alone, but made clear our investigation was continuing. In September 2009, I told the Committee there had never been any evidence delivered to me that suggested the conduct had spread beyond one journalist. If others had evidence that wrongdoing went further, I was not told about it.”

“Finally, I want to express my gratitude to Rupert for a wonderful working life. My admiration and respect for him are unbounded. He has built a magnificent business since I first joined 52 years ago and it has been an honor making my contribution.”

During Mr. Hinton’s tenure at Dow Jones, The Wall Street Journal has become the number one newspaper in the U.S. He has directed initiatives that have expanded the Journal’s scope of coverage, including Greater New York and lifestyle offerings such as WSJ Weekend and WSJ. magazine. On the digital side, WSJ.com has 9.99 million unique visitors in December, 2007. Last month the site had 32.75 million, while the Journal’s iPad app has become the standard for the industry. He also managed the extension of business-to-business products from Dow Jones Newswires and Factiva.

Previously, Mr. Hinton served for 12 years as Executive Chairman of News International, News Corporation’s U.K. newspaper unit. Earlier, he spent 20 years working in the U.S., first as a correspondent for the Company’s newspapers in the U.K. and Australia and later in a series of senior management positions at News Corp.’s publishing and television business units. He was also President and Chief Executive of News America Publishing, responsible for the Company’s U.S. publishing operations, and Chairman and Chief Executive of Fox Televisions. Mr. Hinton became a U.S. citizen in 1985.

Following Mr. Hinton’s departure, Dow Jones President Todd Larsen will report to News Corporation Deputy Chairman, President and COO Chase Carey.

About Dow Jones

Dow Jones is a global provider of news and business information, with newspaper, newswire, website, magazine, database, conference, radio and video businesses including The Wall Street Journal, Dow Jones Newswires, Factiva, Barron’s, MarketWatch, SmartMoney and All Things D.

About News Corporation

News Corporation (NASDAQ: NWS, NWSA; ASX: NWS, NWSLV) had total assets as of March 31, 2011 of approximately US$60 billion and total annual revenues of approximately US$33 billion. News Corporation is a diversified global media company with operations in six industry segments: cable network programming; filmed entertainment; television; direct broadcast satellite television; publishing; and other. The activities of News Corporation are conducted principally in the United States, Continental Europe, the United Kingdom, Australia, Asia and Latin America.

http://www.newscorp.com/news/news_498.html

—————————————————–

Original U.K. Phone-Hacker:  Glenn Mulcaire: The Court of Appeal have listed the appeal which has been lodged by Glenn Mulcaire against the decision of Mr Justice Mann handed down on 17 November 2010 in Phillips v News Group Newspapers ([2010] EWHC 2952 (Ch)).

The private investigator Glenn Mulcaire was ordered by Mr Justice Mann to provide information identifying the “News of the World” journalists who instructed him to hack into voice mail messages.  The Judge ordered Mr Mulcaire to provide information relevant to the claim being brought by Nicola Phillips, a former employee of Max Clifford’s company, against the News of World arising out of alleged phone hacking.

Mr Mulcaire, who was sent to prison in January 2007 for intercepting the voicemail of eight people, had challenged the questions posed on behalf of Ms Phillips on the grounds that providing answers might incriminate him.

The order which was sought was that Mr Mulcaire should swear and serve an affidavit setting out the following information:

a) The nature of the exercise he was instructed to perform which resulted in him intercepting the Claimant’s mobile phone messages and in the course of so doing preparing [the Mulcaire list].

b) The nature of the exercise he was instructed to perform which resulted in him intercepting phone messages from individuals connected with Mr Max Clifford.

c) The identity of the person or persons who instructed him to perform the exercise which resulted in him intercepting the Claimant’s mobile phone messages and in the course of doing so preparing the list of mobile phone numbers referred to above.

d) The identity of the person or persons who instructed him to investigate individuals connected with Mr Max Clifford.

e) In relation to [one number on the list, being that of Mr Edmonson]:

(i) Why was this identified as that of ‘Ian’?

(ii) Was it because the number was already known to him as that of one Ian Edmonson?

(iii) How did it come about that the number was already known to him as being that of Ian Edmonson?

(iv) Did Ian Edmonson request him to investigate the Claimant?

(v) Did Ian Edmonson request him to investigate individuals connected with Max Clifford?

Mr Mulcaire sought to resist providing answers on the basis of the “privilege against self-incrimination”.  Mr Justice Mann agreed that the privilege was applicable but held that the evidence would be covered by section 72 of the Senior Courts Act, which removes the privilege in  inter alia, “proceedings for infringement of rights pertaining to any intellectual property or for passing off“.  As a result, the judge ordered that Mr Mulcaire should provide the information.

The Court of Apeal have provisionally listed the Appeal for the window of 9-May-11 to 31-Oct-11. A number of other actions are awaiting the outcome of the appeal.

The Gray Action

In a related but earlier decision in Gray v Newsgroup Newspapers and Glenn Mulcaire[2010] EWHC 2893, unreported,  Mr Justice Floyd has ordered on 5th October 2010 (by consent) that the Metropolitan Police disclose their evidence to the Claimant  in relation to the activities of Glenn Mulcaire. He also ordered third party disclosure of documents from the Information Commissioner.

After hearing detailed argument from Jeremey Reid, counsel for the Claimant, and from Micheal Silverleaf,  leading counsel for the News of the World, the Judge ordered that the Information Commissioner disclose the documents from the ICO  investigation that pertains to journalists from Newsgroup Newspapers, even though the ICO investigation predated the Mulcaire investigation by some years. The judge relied on two principal reasons:

“Firstly it seems to me that the documents are likely to support the case of the applicant. I have to say that I regard as somewhat artificial the suggestion that, because the documents do not touch directly on tapping into voicemails, in the sense of listening to the substance of the conversations, they are rendered irrelevant on that ground. I have the benefit of a witness statement made by Mr Clancy of the Information Commissioner’s Office, in which he (while accepting that the documents do not specifically show that phone hacking was taking place) says they do suggest that illegal activities are being commissioned, and makes it clear that, not only does the Information Commissioner support the application, but considers that the documents are likely to be helpful. I do not think that one can draw the precise line between phone tapping by means of identifying recipients of calls, and listening to the contents of the calls, which Mr Silverleaf seeks to identify….[10]

I should consider whether to exercise my discretion in this case to grant the order sought. There is no doubt that these documents exist, indeed they have been disclosed in previous civil actions, and I am told have been disclosed to NGN themselves. Whether or not that is right, it seems to me that what I am dealing with essentially is a package of documents, which will not require very much work in order to assemble, and which I am entitled to infer that some attention may already have been given. In those circumstances, there is at least that positive reason for believing that the burden on the case is not likely to be too great.”

—————————————————–

Resources: Rupert Murdoch

ABC Television Documentary: Dynasties – The Murdochs  – September 2010

Rupert Murdoch is one of the most powerful men on earth. His global information empire, News Corporation, reaches two-thirds of the world’s population. So what makes Rupert tick, and what qualifies this family to continue its hold on so much wealth and power?

News Corporation – Official Press Releases – http://www.newscorp.com/news

Woopidoo – Rupert Murdoch Bio – http://www.woopidoo.com/biography/rupert-murdoch.htm

—————————————————–

BIO: Rupert Murdoch

Rupert Murdoch

Murdoch at the 2011 Tribeca Film FestivalVanity Fair party
Born Keith Rupert Murdoch
11 March 1931 (age 80)
Melbourne, Australia
Nationality United States (naturalized 1985)
Citizenship United States
Occupation Chairman and CEO of
News Corporation
Net worth increaseUS$7.6 billion (2011)[1]
Spouse Patricia Booker (m. 1956–1967)
Anna Maria Torv (m. 1967–1999)
Wendi Deng (m. 1999–present)
Children Prudence Murdoch (b. 1958)
Elisabeth Murdoch (b. 1968)
Lachlan Murdoch (b. 1971)
James Murdoch (b. 1972)
Grace Murdoch (b. 2001)
Chloe Murdoch (b. 2005)
Parents Keith Murdoch (1885–1952)
Elisabeth Joy (née Greene)(b. 1909)
Relatives Matthew Freud (son-in-law)
Awards Companion of the Order of Australia (1984).[2]
Notes
a Australian citizenship lost in 1985 with acquisition of U.S nationality.

Keith Rupert MurdochACKSG (English pronunciation: /ˈruːpərt ˈmɜrdɒk/; born 11 March 1931) is an Australian Americanmedia mogul and the Chairman and CEO of News Corporation.

Beginning with one newspaper in Adelaide, Murdoch acquired and started other publications in his native Australia before expanding News Corp into the United Kingdom, United States and Asian media markets. Although it was in Australia in the late 1950s that he first dabbled in television, he later sold these assets, and News Corp’s Australian current media interests (still mainly in print) are restricted by cross-media ownership rules. Murdoch’s first permanent foray into TV was in the USA, where he created Fox Broadcasting Company in 1986. In the 2000s, he became a leading investor in satellite television, the film industry and the Internet, and purchased a respected business newspaper, The Wall Street Journal.

Rupert Murdoch was listed three times in the Time 100 as among the most influential people in the world. He is ranked 13th most powerful person in the world in the 2010 Forbes The World’s Most Powerful People list.[3] With a net worth of US$6.3 billion, he is ranked 117th wealthiest person in the world.[4]


Keith Rupert Murdoch was born in Melbourne, the only son of Sir Keith Murdoch and Elisabeth Joy (née Greene). At the time, his father was a regional newspaper magnate based in Melbourne, and as a result, the family was wealthy. Murdoch was groomed by his father from an early age, and attended the elite Geelong Grammar School. He later read Philosophy, Politics and Economics at Worcester College, Oxford University in the United Kingdom, where he supported the Labour Party.[5]
Early life

Start in business

When Murdoch was 22, his father died, prompting his return from Oxford to take charge of the family business; becoming managing director of News Limited in 1953.[5] He began to direct his attention to acquisition and expansion. He bought the Sunday Times in Perth, Western Australia.

Over the next few years, Murdoch established himself in Australia as a dynamic business operator, expanding his holdings by acquiring suburban and provincial newspapers in New South Wales, Queensland, Victoria and the Northern Territory, including the Sydney afternoon tabloid, The Daily Mirror, as well as a small Sydney-based recording company, Festival Records.

His first foray outside Australia involved the purchase of a controlling interest in the New Zealand daily The Dominion. In January 1964, while touring New Zealand with friends in a rented Morris Minor after sailing across the Tasman, Murdoch read of a takeover bid for the Wellington paper by the British-based Canadian newspaper magnate, Lord Thomson of Fleet. On the spur of the moment, he launched a counter-bid. A four-way battle for control ensued in which the 32-year-old Murdoch was ultimately successful.

Later in 1964, Murdoch launched The Australian, Australia’s first national daily newspaper, which was based first in Canberra and later in Sydney. The Australian, abroadsheet, was intended to give Murdoch new respectability as a ‘quality’ newspaper publisher, as well as greater political influence.

In 1972, Murdoch acquired the Sydney morning tabloid The Daily Telegraph from Australian media mogul Sir Frank Packer, who later admitted regretting selling it to him. In that year’s election, Murdoch threw his growing power behind the Australian Labor Party under the leadership of Gough Whitlam and duly saw it elected.

Building News Corporation: Acquisitions in Britain

Rupert Murdoch – World Economic Forum Annual Meeting Davos 2007

In 1968 Murdoch entered the UK newspaper market with his acquistion of the News of the World, soon followed in 1969 of the then broadsheet daily newspaper The Sun from IPC. Murdoch turned it into a tabloid format, and reduced costs by using the same printing press for both newspapers; by 2006 it was selling three million copies per day.[6]

In 1981, Murdoch acquired The Times and The Sunday Times, (the papers which Lord Northcliffe had once owned) from Canadian newspaper publisher Lord Thomson of Fleet. The distinction of owning The Times came to him through his careful cultivation of its owner, who had grown tired of losing money on it as a result of much industrial action and limited ability to publish for several months.[7]

During the 1980s and early 1990s, Murdoch’s publications were generally supportive of Britain’s Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher.[8] At the end of the Thatcher/Major era, Murdoch switched his support to the Labour Party and its leader, Tony Blair. The closeness of his relationship with Blair and their secret meetings to discuss national policies was to become a political issue in Britain.[9] Though this later started to change, with The Sun publicly renouncing the ruling Labour government and lending its support to David Cameron‘s Conservative Party, which soon after came to form a coalition government. Former Prime Minister Gordon Brown’s official spokesman said in November 2009 that Brown and Murdoch “were in regular communication” and that “there is nothing unusual in the prime minister talking to Rupert Murdoch”.[10]

In 1986, Murdoch introduced electronic production processes to his newspapers in Australia, Britain and the United States. The greater degree of automation led to significant reductions in the number of employees involved in the printing process. In England, the move roused the anger of the print unions, resulting in a long and often violent dispute that played out in Wapping, one of London’s docklands areas, where Murdoch had installed the very latest electronic newspaper publishing facility in an old warehouse.[11] The bitter dispute at Fortress Wapping started with the dismissal of 6,000 employees who had gone on strike and resulted in street battles, demonstrations and a great deal of bad publicity for Murdoch. Many on the political left in Britain suspected Margaret Thatcher’s Conservative government of collusion with Murdoch in the Wapping affair, as a way of damaging the British trade union movement, by providing large numbers of police to attack and arrest pickets using violence and provocation.[12]

Murdoch’s British-based satellite network, Sky Television, incurred massive losses in its early years of operation. As with many of his other business interests, Sky was heavily subsidised by the profits generated by his other holdings, but eventually he was able to convince rival satellite operator British Satellite Broadcasting to accept a merger on his terms in 1990. The merged company, BSkyB, has dominated the British pay-TV market ever since.[13]

In response to print media’s decline and the increasing influence of online journalism during the 2000s,[14] Murdoch proclaimed his support of the micropayments model for obtaining revenue from on-line news,[15] although this has been criticised by some.[16]

News Corporation has subsidiaries in the Bahamas, the Cayman Islands, the Channel Islands and the Virgin Islands. From 1986, News Corporation’s annual tax bill averaged around seven percent of its profits.[17]

United States

Murdoch made his first acquisition in the United States in 1973, when he purchased the San Antonio Express-News. Soon afterwards, he founded Star, a supermarket tabloid, and in 1976, he purchased the New York Post. On 4 September 1985, Murdoch became a naturalised citizen to satisfy the legal requirement that only US citizens were permitted to own American television stations. Also in 1985, Murdoch purchased the 20th Century Fox movie studio. In 1986, Murdoch purchased six television stations owned by Metromedia. These stations would form the nucleus of the Fox Broadcasting Company, which was founded on 9 October 1986. In 1987, in Australia he bought The Herald and Weekly Times Ltd, the company that his father had once managed. By 1991, his Australian-based News Corp. had worked up huge debts (much from Sky TV in the UK)[citation needed], forcing Murdoch to sell many of the American magazine interests he had acquired in the mid-1980s.

In 1995, Murdoch’s Fox Network became the object of scrutiny from the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), when it was alleged that News Ltd.’s Australian base made Murdoch’s ownership of Fox illegal. However, the FCC ruled in Murdoch’s favor, stating that his ownership of Fox was in the best interests of the public. That same year, Murdoch announced a deal with MCI Communications to develop a major news website and magazine, The Weekly Standard. Also that year, News Corp. launched theFoxtel pay television network in Australia in partnership with Telstra.

In 1996, Murdoch decided to enter the cable news market with the Fox News Channel, a 24-hour cable news television station. Ratings studies released in the fourth quarter of 2004 showed that the network was responsible for nine of the top ten programs in the “Cable News” category at that time[citation needed]. Rupert Murdoch and Ted Turner(founder and former owner of CNN) are long-standing rivals.[citation needed]

In late 2003, Murdoch acquired a 34 percent stake in Hughes Electronics, the operator of the largest American satellite TV system, DirecTV, from General Motors for $6 billion (USD).

In 2004, Murdoch announced that he was moving News Corp.’s headquarters from Adelaide, Australia to the United States. Choosing a US domicile was designed to ensure that American fund managers could purchase shares in the company, since many were deciding not to buy shares in non-US companies. Some analysts believed that News Corp.’s Australian domicile was leading to the company being undervalued compared with its peers.

On 20 July 2005, News Corp. bought Intermix Media Inc., which held MySpace.com and other popular social networking-themed websites, for $580 million USD.[18] On 11 September 2005, News Corp. announced that it would buy IGN Entertainment for $650 million (USD).[19]

In May 2007, Murdoch made a $5 billion offer to purchase Dow Jones, owner of the Wall Street Journal. At the time, the Bancroft family, which controlled 64% of the shares, firmly declined the offer, opposing Murdoch’s much-used strategy of slashing employee numbers and “gutting” existing systems. Later, the Bancroft family confirmed a willingness to consider a sale – besides Murdoch, the Associated Press reported that supermarket magnate Ron Burkle and Internet entrepreneur Brad Greenspan were among the interested parties.[20] On 1 August 2007, the BBC’s “News and World Report”[21] and NPR’s Marketplace[22] radio programs reported that Murdoch had acquired Dow Jones; this news was received with mixed reactions.

Australia

In 1999, Murdoch significantly expanded his music holdings in Australia by acquiring the controlling share in a leading Australian independent label, Michael Gudinski‘sMushroom Records; he merged that with Festival Records, and the result was Festival Mushroom Records (FMR). Both Festival and FMR were managed by Murdoch’s sonJames Murdoch for several years.

Expansion in Asia

In 1993, Murdoch acquired Star TV, a Hong Kong company founded by Richard Li for $1 billion (Souchou, 2000:28), and subsequently set up offices for it throughout Asia. It is one of the biggest satellite TV networks in Asia. However, the deal did not work out as Murdoch had planned, because the Chinese government placed restrictions on it that prevented it from reaching most of China. It was around this time that Murdoch met his third wife Wendi Deng.

Political activities

Australia

Murdoch found a political ally in John McEwen, leader of the Australian Country Party (now known as the National Party of Australia), who was governing in coalition with the larger Menzies-Holt Liberal Party. From the very first issue of The Australian Murdoch began taking McEwen’s side in every issue that divided the long-serving coalition partners. (The Australian, 15 July 1964, first edition, front page: “Strain in Cabinet, Liberal-CP row flares.”) It was an issue that threatened to split the coalition government and open the way for the stronger Australian Labor Party to dominate Australian politics. It was the beginning of a long campaign that served McEwen well.[25]

After McEwen and Menzies retired, Murdoch transferred his support to the newly elected Leader of the Australian Labor Party, Gough Whitlam, who was elected in 1972 on a social platform that included universal free health care, free education for all Australians to tertiary level, recognition of the People’s Republic of China, and public ownership of Australia’s oil, gas and mineral resources.

Rupert Murdoch’s flirtation with Whitlam turned out to be brief. He had already started his short-lived National Star[25] newspaper in America, and was seeking to strengthen his political contacts there.[26]

United States Citizenship

In 1985 Murdoch became a United States citizen to satisfy legislation that only United States citizens could own American television stations. This also resulted in Murdoch losing his Australian citizenship.[27][28]

Asked about the Australian federal election, 2007 at News Corporation’s annual general meeting in New York on 19 October 2007, its chairman Rupert Murdoch said, “I am not commenting on anything to do with Australian politics. I’m sorry. I always get into trouble when I do that.” Pressed as to whether he believed Prime Minister John Howardshould be re-elected, he said: “I have nothing further to say. I’m sorry. Read our editorials in the papers. It’ll be the journalists who decide that – the editors.”[29]

United States

McNight (2010) identifies four characteristics of his media operations: free market ideology; unified positions on matters of public policy; global editorial meetings; and opposition to a perceived liberal bias in other public media.[30]

On 8 May 2006, the Financial Times reported that Murdoch would be hosting a fund-raiser for Senator Hillary Clinton‘s (D-New York) Senate re-election campaign.[31]

In a 2008 interview with Walt Mossberg, Murdoch was asked whether he had “anything to do with the New York Post‘s endorsement of Barack Obama in the democratic primaries.” Without hesitating, Murdoch replied, “Yeah. He is a rock star. It’s fantastic. I love what he is saying about education. I don’t think he will win Florida… but he will win in Ohio and the election. I am anxious to meet him. I want to see if he will walk the walk.”[32][33]

In 2010 News Corporation gave $1M to the Republican Governors Association and $1M to the U.S. Chamber of Commerce.[34][35][36]

Murdoch also served on the board of directors of the libertarian Cato Institute.[37]

United Kingdom

In Britain in the 1980s Murdoch formed a close alliance with Margaret Thatcher, and The Sun credited itself with helping John Major to win an unexpected election victory inthe 1992 general election.[38] However, in the general elections of 19972001 and 2005, Murdoch’s papers were either neutral or supported Labour under Tony Blair. This has led some critics to argue that Murdoch simply supports the incumbent parties (or those who seem most likely to win an upcoming election) in the hope of influencing government decisions that may affect his businesses. The Labour Party under Blair had moved from the Left to a more central position on many economic issues prior to 1997. Murdoch identifies himself as a libertarian, this use of the term, however, being one many would not recognize.[39][40]

In a speech delivered in New York, Rupert Murdoch said that the British Prime Minister Tony Blair described the BBC coverage of the Hurricane Katrina disaster as being full of hatred of America.[41]

In 1998, Rupert Murdoch failed in his attempt to buy the football club Manchester United F.C. with an offer of £625 million. It was the largest amount ever offered for a sports club. It was blocked by the United Kingdom’s Competition Commission, which stated that the acquisition would have “hurt competition in the broadcast industry and the quality of British football”.

On 28 June 2006 the BBC reported that Murdoch and News Corporation were flirting with the idea of backing Conservative leader David Cameron at the next General Election.[42] However, in a later interview in July 2006, when he was asked what he thought of the Conservative leader, Murdoch replied “Not much”.[43] In a 2009 blog, it was suggested that in the aftermath of the News of the World phone hacking scandal which is still ongoing in 2011 and might yet have Transatlantic implications [44] , Murdoch and News Corporation might have decided to back Cameron[45] Despite this there had already been a convergence of interests between the two men over the muting of Britain’s communications regulator Ofcom.[46]

In 2006, Britain’s Independent newspaper reported that Murdoch would offer Tony Blair a senior role in his global media company News Corp. when the prime minister stood down from office.[47]

He is accused by former Solidarity MSP Tommy Sheridan of having a personal vendetta against him and of conspiring with MI5 to produce a video of him confessing to having affairs – allegations over which Sheridan had previously sued News International and won.[48] On being arrested for perjury following the case, Sheridan claimed that the charges were “orchestrated and influenced by the powerful reach of the Murdoch empire”.[49]

Offline Life

Murdoch has been married three times. In 1956 he married Patricia Booker, a former shop assistant and flight attendant from Melbourne with whom he had his first child, a daughter, Prudence, born in 1958. Rupert and Patricia Murdoch divorced in 1967.

In 1967 Murdoch married Anna Torv, a Scottish-born cadet journalist working for his Sydney newspaper The Daily Telegraph(not to be mistaken for the actress Anna Torv of Fringe who is the elder Torv’s niece). During his marriage to Torv, a Roman Catholic, Murdoch was awarded the KSG, a papal honour.

Torv and Murdoch had three children: Elisabeth Murdoch (born in Sydney, Australia on 22 August 1968), Lachlan Murdoch (born in London, UK on 8 September 1971), and James Murdoch, (born in Wimbledon, UK on 13 December 1972). Murdoch’s companies published two novels by his then wife: Family Business (1988) and Coming to Terms (1991), both widely regarded[61] as vanity publications. Anna and Rupert divorced in June 1999.

Anna Murdoch received a settlement of US$ 1.2 billion in assets.[62] Seventeen days after the divorce, on 25 June 1999, Murdoch, then aged 68, married Chinese-born Deng Wendi (Wendi Deng in Western style). She was 30, a recent Yale School of Management graduate, and a newly appointed vice-president of STAR TV.

Rupert Murdoch has two children with Deng: Grace Helen (born in New York 19 November 2001) and Chloe (born in New York 17 July 2003).

Children

Murdoch’s eldest son Lachlan, formerly the deputy chief operating officer at the News Corporation and the publisher of the New York Post, was Murdoch’s heir apparentbefore resigning from his executive posts at the global media company at the end of July 2005. Lachlan’s departure left James Murdoch chief executive of the satellite television service British Sky Broadcasting since November 2003, as the only Murdoch son still directly involved with the company’s operations, though Lachlan has agreed to remain on the News Corporation’s board.

After graduating from Vassar College and marrying classmate Elkin Kwesi Pianim (the son of Ghanaian financial and political mogul Kwame Pianim) in 1993, Murdoch’s daughter Elisabeth, along with her husband, purchased a pair of NBC-affiliate television stations in California, KSBW and KSBY, with a $35 million loan provided by her father. By quickly re-organising and re-selling them at a $12 million profit in 1995, Elisabeth emerged as an unexpected rival to her brothers for the eventual leadership of the publishing dynasty’s empire. But after divorcing her first husband in 1998 and quarrelling publicly with her assigned mentor Sam Chisholm at BSkyB, she struck out on her own as a television and film producer in London. She has since enjoyed independent success, in conjunction with her second husband, Matthew Freud, the great-grandson of Sigmund Freud (the founder of psychoanalysis) whom she married in 2001.

It is not known whether Murdoch will remain as News Corp.’s CEO indefinitely. For a while the American cable television entrepreneur John Malone was the second-largest voting shareholder in News Corporation after Murdoch himself, potentially undermining the family’s control. In 2007, the company announced that it would sell certain assets and give cash to Malone’s company in exchange for its stock. In 2007 Murdoch issued his older children with equal voting stock, perhaps to test their individual levels of interest and ability to run the company according to the standards he has set.

Portrayal on television, in film, books and music

Rupert Murdoch and rival newspaper and publishing magnate Robert Maxwell are thinly fictionalised as “Keith Townsend” and “Richard Armstrong” in The Fourth Estate by British novelist and former MP Jeffrey Archer.[63]

Rupert Murdoch has been portrayed by Barry Humphries in the 1991 mini-series Selling HitlerHugh Laurie in a parody of It’s a Wonderful Life in the television show A Bit of Fry & LaurieBen Mendelsohn in the film Black and White, Paul Elder in The Late Shift and by himself on The Simpsons first in “Sunday, Cruddy Sunday” and most recently in “Judge Me Tender“.

It has been speculated that the character of Elliot Carver, the global media magnate and main villain in the 1997 James Bond movie Tomorrow Never Dies, is based on Rupert Murdoch. The writer of the film, Bruce Feirstein, has stated that Carver was actually inspired by British press magnate Robert Maxwell, who was one of Murdoch’s rivals.[64]

In 1999, the Ted Turner owned TBS aired an original sitcom, The Chimp Channel. This featured an all-simian cast and the role of an Australian TV veteran named Harry Waller. The character is described as “a self-made gazillionaire with business interests in all sorts of fields. He owns newspapers, hotel chains, sports franchises and genetic technologies, as well as everyone’s favorite cable TV channel, The Chimp Channel.” Waller is thought to be a parody of Murdoch, a long-time rival of Turner’s.[65]

In 2004, the movie Outfoxed included many interviews accusing Fox News of pressuring reporters to report only one side of news stories, in order to influence viewers’ political opinions.[66] The movie did a quick inventory of Rupert Murdoch’s media holdings, indicating that his media reached approximately 3/4 of the world’s population.[67]

See also

Notes

  1. ^ Rupert Murdoch profile page Forbes.com. Retrieved September 2010.
  2. ^ “AC AD84. For service to the media, particularly the newspaper publishing industry.”“Australian Honours”. Australian Government. Retrieved 27 February 2010.
  3. ^ The World’s Most Powerful PeopleForbes.
  4. ^ The World’s BillionairesForbes.
  5. a b Walker, Andrew (31 July 2002). “Rupert Murdoch: Bigger than Kane”. British Broadcasting Corporation. Retrieved 27 December 2009.
  6. ^ Page (2003) pp. 131–35, et seq.
  7. ^ Harold Evans, Good Times, Bad Times, 1983
  8. ^ Page (2003) p. 3, pp. 253–419
  9. ^ Hinsliff, Gaby (23 July 2006). “The PM, the mogul and the secret agenda”.The Guardian (London). Retrieved 10 April 2010.
  10. ^ Mulholland, Hélène (12 November 2009). “Gordon Brown spoke to Rupert Murdoch after misspelling row”The Guardian (London)
  11. ^ Page (2003), pp. 368–393
  12. ^ Rt. Hon. Tony Benn cited in Hansard, 8 May 1986. ‘The mounted police advanced out of the plant exactly as the tactical options manual says that they should. They ran into the crowd. They were covered by riot police who did several things. First they ran indiscriminately into the crowd and battered people who had had nothing whatsoever to do with any stones that might have been thrown. . . They surrounded the bus that was acting as an ambulance. One man had a heart attack and I appealed over the loudspeaker for the police to withdraw to allow an ambulance to come. None was allowed for 30 minutes. When the man was put on a trestle a police horse jostled it and the man nearly fell off as he was carried out to the ambulance. The police surrounded the park where the meeting took place. They surrounded the area so that people could not escape.’
  13. ^ OFTEL Submission to the ITC on competition issues arising from the award of digital terrestrial television multiplex licences:”The OFT has already found BSkyB to be dominant in the wholesale market for premium programming content (particularly certain sports and movie rights). BSkyB also currently controls the satellite network for direct to the home (DTH) pay television in the UK. Given its control of premium programming content, it also controls a vital input into the cable companies transmission and programme activities.”http://www.ofcom.org.uk/static/archive/oftel/ind_info/broadcasting/dtt.htm
  14. ^ Jonny Blog (19 May 2009). “Blogspot”. J-blogswebzine.blogspot.com. Retrieved 25 April 2010.
  15. ^ Clark, Andrew (7 May 2009). “News Corp will charge for newspaper websites, says Rupert Murdoch”The Guardian (London). Retrieved 10 April 2010.
  16. ^ Shirky, Clay (13 March 2009). “Newspapers and Thinking the Unthinkable”. Shirky.com. Retrieved 25 April 2010.
  17. ^ Chenoweth (2001) pp. 300–303, 87–90, 177
  18. ^ “News Corp in $580m internet buy”. BBC News. 19 July 2005. Retrieved 29 August 2010.
  19. ^ “News Corp. Acquires IGN for $650 Million”BusinessWeek. 11 September 2005. Retrieved 25 April 2010.
  20. ^ Associated Press “Burkle, Web Exec Might Team on Dow”[dead link]
  21. ^ Litterick, David (1 August 2007). “Daily Telegraph report of acquisition”The Daily Telegraph (London). Retrieved 25 April 2010.
  22. ^ Day to Day. “Marketplace Report: Murdoch’s Big Buy”. Npr.org. Retrieved 25 April 2010.
  23. ^ “Seven loses C7 case”ABC News. Australia. 27 July 2007. Retrieved 25 April 2010.
  24. ^ here [1][dead link]
  25. a b Don Garden, Theodor Fink: A Talent for Ubiquity (Melbourne University Press 1998)
  26. ^ Shawcross, pp. 30–39
  27. ^ Given, Jock (December 2002). “Foreign Ownership of Media and Telecommunications: an Australian story”Media & Arts Law Review 7 (4): 253
  28. ^ “The World’s Billionaires No.73 Rupert Murdoch”Forbes. 7 October 2007. Retrieved 8 October 2009
  29. ^ Michael Roland, Murdoch tight-lipped on electionABC News Online, published 20 October 2007
  30. ^ David McKnight, “Rupert Murdoch’s News Corporation: A Media Institution with A Mission,” Historical Journal of Film, Radio & Television, Sept 2010, Vol. 30 Issue 3, pp 303–316,
  31. ^ “/ US & Canada – Murdoch to host fundraiser for Hillary Clinton”Financial Times. 8 May 2006. Retrieved 25 April 2010.
  32. ^ Read Andrew Sullivan in TheAtlantic magazine (29 May 2008). “The Daily Dish , By Andrew Sullivan”. Andrewsullivan.theatlantic.com. Retrieved 25 April 2010.
  33. ^ “Hilary Rosen: Rupert Murdoch Says Obama Will Win”Huffington Post. USA. Retrieved 25 April 2010.
  34. ^ Rutenberg, Jim (1 October 2010). “News Corp. Donates $1 million to U.S. Chamber of Commerce”New York Times. Retrieved 10 October 2010.
  35. ^ “Rupert Murdoch’s News Corp. donates $1M to U.S. Chamber of Commerce”. cleveland.com. 2 October 2010. Retrieved 10 October 2010.
  36. ^ “Murdoch says Kasich friendship influenced $1 million donation”. Yahoo News. 7 October 2010. Retrieved 11 October 2010.
  37. ^ Murdoch Joins Board of Directors[dead link]
  38. ^ Douglas, Torin (14 September 2004). “Forty years of The Sun”BBC News. Retrieved 10 April 2010.
  39. ^ “Murdoch’s politics”. Sourcewatch.org. Retrieved 25 April 2010.
  40. ^ Shawcross, William (3 November 1999). “Rupert Murdoch”TIME. Retrieved 29 August 2010.
  41. ^ “Blair ‘attacked BBC over Katrina'”. BBC News. 18 September 2005. Retrieved 29 August 2010.
  42. ^ “Murdoch flirts with Conservatives”. BBC News. 28 June 2006. Retrieved 25 April 2010.
  43. ^ Wapshott, Nicholas (23 July 2006). “The world according to Rupert”The Independent (London). Retrieved 25 April 2010.
  44. ^ http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-14111966
  45. ^ “Rupert Murdoch to back David Cameron at next general election – exclusive”The Daily Telegraph (London). 10 July 2009. Retrieved 10 April 2010.
  46. ^ “Paying tribute to Murdoch: Cameron promises the end of Ofcom “as we know it” , Media Money”. Blogs.pressgazette.co.uk. 6 July 2009. Retrieved 25 April 2010.
  47. ^ Grice, Andrew (29 July 2006). “Murdoch set to back Blair – for a place in his boardroom”The Independent (London). Retrieved 25 April 2010.
  48. ^ “Sheridan claims to be ‘victim of MI5 plot'”The Scotsman. UK. Retrieved 25 April 2010.[dead link]
  49. ^ Sengupta, Kim (17 December 2007). “Tommy Sheridan charged with perjury”The Independent (London). Retrieved 25 April 2010.
  50. ^ Murphy, Paul (2 February 2006). “How Murdoch plans to win friends and influence people – Former Labour spin doctor shows how to gain the ear of policymakers”The Guardian (London). Retrieved 27 November 2008.
  51. ^ Grice, Andrew (24 October 2008). “Cameron, Murdoch and a Greek island freebie”The Independent (London). Retrieved 25 October 2008.
  52. ^ Hencke, David (25 October 2008). “Tories try to play down Aegean dinner”.The Guardian (London). Retrieved 25 October 2008.
  53. ^ “The Battle of Wapping, Mk II – Press, Media”The Independent (UK). Retrieved 12 July 2011.
  54. ^ Toby Helm and Daniel Boffey. “Phone hacking: I warned No 10 over Coulson appointment, says Ashdown”Guardian. UK. Retrieved 12 July 2011.
  55. ^ “When Rudd met Murdoch subject menu was secret”The Sydney Morning Herald. 22 April 2007. Retrieved 26 October 2008.
  56. ^ “Comment: Rudd and the Murdoch Press”The Monthly: pp. 8–11. September 2009. Retrieved 26 October 2009.
  57. ^ 7 November 2009 12:00 am (7 November 2009). “Rudd too sensitive for own good: Murdoch”The Australian. Retrieved 25 April 2010.
  58. ^ “Murdoch criticises Rudd , Finance”. BigPond News. 7 November 2009. Retrieved 25 April 2010.[dead link]
  59. ^ Canuck prime minister in Sun TV News furor: Harper, Murdoch lunch rattles Fox News North opponents[dead link] Hollywood Reporter 6 September 2010
  60. ^ Tuesdays with Rupert Vanity Fair October 2008
  61. ^ “”Murdoch’s companies published two novels by his then wife: Family Business (1988) and Coming to Terms (1991); both are widely regarded as vanity publications.””. Wn.com. Retrieved 12 July 2011.
  62. ^ “‘,The Boy Who Wouldn’t Be King’,”. Nymag.com. 19 September 2005. Retrieved 25 April 2010.
  63. ^ “The Fourth Estate”. The Official Site for Jefferey Archer. Retrieved 29 August 2010.[dead link]
  64. ^ Feirstein, Bruce (29 January 2008). “Bruce Feirstein: The Tao of Bond-Film Naming.”Vanity Fair.
  65. ^ Lucas, Michael P. [2] Los Angeles Times (1 June 1999). Retrieved on 8 April 2010.
  66. ^ Memmott, Mark (12 July 2004). “”Another film joins the political debate today when Outfoxed: Rupert Murdoch’s War on Journalism is unveiled in New York.’Outfoxed’ accuses Fox of slanting the news. Outfoxed, which is being promoted by the liberal advocacy group MoveOn, charges that Fox News executives order their cable TV anchors, reporters and producers to slant the news to be pro-Republican and pro-Bush administration.””USA Today. Retrieved 12 July 2011.
  67. ^ http://community.eu.playstation.com/t5/Chew-the-fat-on-the-sofa/What-s-some-good-documentaries-you-ve-seen/td-p/11207405 “Outfoxed: Rupert Murdoch’s War On Journalism – A look at the reach of the fox [sic] news network (around 3/4 of the earth’s population), and how certain views are over-looked or enhanced, depending on how they want to affect opinions.”
  68. ^ Rupert Murdoch Laid Bare[dead link]
  69. ^ “Tax free: Rupert Murdoch’s zero status”. BBC News. 25 March 1999. Retrieved 25 April 2010.
  70. ^ 2008 CEO Compensation for K. Rupert Murdoch, Equilar.com
  71. ^ Rupert Murdoch profile page Forbes. Retrieved September 2010.

References

  • Chenoweth, Neil (2001). Rupert Murdoch, the untold story of the world’s greatest media wizard. New York: Random House.
  • Conrad, Mark (25 April 1999). “Murdoch Stymied in Purchase of ‘United'”. Retrieved 23 June 2007[dead link]
  • Dover, Bruce. Rupert’s Adventures in China: How Murdoch Lost A Fortune And Found A Wife (Mainstream Publishing).
  • Ellison, Sarah. War at the Wall Street Journal: Inside the Struggle To Control an American Business Empire, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2010. ISBN 9780547152431 (Also published as: War at The Wall Street Journal: How Rupert Murdoch Bought an American Icon, Melbourne, Text Publishing, 2010.)
  • Evans, Harold. Good Times, Bad Times, London: Weidenfeld and Nicolson, 1983
  • Harcourt, Alison (2006). European Union Institutions and the Regulation of Media Markets. London, New York: Manchester University Press.ISBN [[Special:BookSources/0719066441
  • McKnight, David. “Rupert Murdoch’s News Corporation: A Media Institution with A Mission,” Historical Journal of Film, Radio and Television, Sept 2010, Vol. 30 Issue 3, pp 303–316
  • Page, Bruce (2003). The Murdoch Archipelago. Simon and Schuster UK.
  • Shawcross, William (1997). Murdoch: the making of a media empire. New York: Simon and Schuster.
  • Souchou, Yao (2000). “House of Glass – Culture, Modernity, and the State in Southeast Asia”. Bangkok: White Lotus.|0719066441
  • McKnight, David. “Rupert Murdoch’s News Corporation: A Media Institution with A Mission,” Historical Journal of Film, Radio and Television, Sept 2010, Vol. 30 Issue 3, pp 303–316
  • Page, Bruce (2003). The Murdoch Archipelago. Simon and Schuster UK.
  • Shawcross, William (1997). Murdoch: the making of a media empire. New York: Simon and Schuster.
  • Souchou, Yao (2000). “House of Glass – Culture, Modernity, and the State in Southeast Asia”. Bangkok: White Lotus.]].

External links

Find more about Rupert Murdoch on Wikipedia’s sister projects:
Images and media from Commons
News stories from Wikinews
Quotations from Wikiquote

Comments are closed.