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Last Nail in a Coffin: Fairfax Family Bows Out of Publishing

Posted: November 11th, 2011 | Author: | Filed under: Bailout, Digital Media, Favorite New Thought . . ., Media, Michael Courtenay, Online Media, Print Media, Social Media, Socially Engineered, Standout | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on Last Nail in a Coffin: Fairfax Family Bows Out of Publishing

Today sees the end of an era at Fairfax Media, and Australian newspaper publishing, as the family that built the countries first publishing empire announced it had sold its remaining stake in the company. The news affirms that the demise of paper publications is set to become chronic. People can now easily and freely access news from virtually anywhere in the world using digital media via phones, tablets and computers, leaving the humble broadsheet close to redundant. Printed newspapers and magazines continue to struggle on both the standard measures, circulation and copies sold, as the industry waits hand in pocket, for a combined readership measure for both print and digital editions, hold your breath, it’s coming, really it is? And while the Fairfax family might have shed it’s under-performing publishing stock, those still sat around boardrooms must have some serious scowls, the Audit Bureau of Circulation figures for the September quarter contained little good news for either of the major Australian publishers, News Ltd or Fairfax Media. News Ltd’s Sydney Morning Herald saw its overall circulation shrinking by almost 5 percent in the quarter, while News Ltd’s weekend editions copped a steep fall of close to 8 percent. The Fairfax model for publishing has missed several key opportunities over the past decade, positioned well 5 years ago, Fairfax Digital should have become the companies flagship, instead the group made several bad attempts at resuscitating it’s print business? oops! M★C READ MORE 


Bachelor Nations

Posted: October 30th, 2011 | Author: | Filed under: Blip, Love and Other Drugs, Michael Courtenay, News, Socially Engineered, That Human Condition | Tags: , , , , , , | Comments Off on Bachelor Nations

Nature provides an unbending biological standard for the sex ratio at birth of 104-106 males to every 100 females.

Bachelor Nations

As the global population hits seven billion, experts are warning that skewed gender ratios could fuel the emergence of volatile “bachelor nations” driven by an aggressive competition for brides. The precise consequences of what French population expert Christophe Guilmoto calls the “alarming demographic masculinisation” of countries such as India and China as the result of sex-selective abortion remain unclear. But many demographers believe the resulting shortage of adult women over the next 50 years will have as deep and pervasive an impact as climate change.

The statistics behind the warnings are grimly compelling. Nature provides an unbending biological standard for the sex ratio at birth of 104-106 males to every 100 females. Any significant divergence from that narrow range can only be explained by abnormal factors.

CONTINUED: Read the full article »»»»


Corey Helford Gallery: Ray Caesar

Posted: October 22nd, 2011 | Author: | Filed under: Art and About - Los Angeles, Art News, Favorite New Thought . . ., Michael Courtenay | Tags: , , , , , | Comments Off on Corey Helford Gallery: Ray Caesar

Opening Reception Saturday, October 22, 2011 from 7‑10pm
On View October 22 – November 12, 2011
Los Angeles, CA

Format: Digital

One of our favorite thoughts, Ray Caesar, has an exhibition opening this weekend at Corey Helford Gallery in Los Angeles. “A Dangerous Inclination” continues on Caesar’s cathartic theme of elegantly haunting works. Caesar’s latest works disclose a more personal side to his narratives. While maintaning the self disclosure theme “A Dangerous Inclination” has definite notes of difference.  Ray Caesar was born in 1958 in London. At an early age, his family moved to Toronto, Canada, where he currently resides. From 1977—80 he attended Ontario College of Art, followed by 17 years from 1980—96 working in the art & photography department of the Hospital For Sick Children in Toronto, documenting disturbing cases of child abuse, surgical reconstruction, psychology, and animal research. Coupled with inspiration from surrealists Kahlo and Dali, Caesar’s experiences at the hospital continue to influence his artwork. His haunting imagery is created digitally using 3D modeling software called Maya, mastered while working in digital animation for television and film industries from 1998—2001. In 1999, Caesar received a Primetime Emmy Nomination for Outstanding Special Effects in a series.

CONTINUED: Read the full article »»»»


Bad Journalism: Daily Mail Style

Posted: October 6th, 2011 | Author: | Filed under: Bipolar Blond Momentum, Blip, Cult of Celebrity, Favorite New Thought . . ., Michael Courtenay, News Update | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on Bad Journalism: Daily Mail Style

This incident never happened. It was created, as a sort of journalistic montage, by the correspondent who distilled the report. Newspapers are neither written nor edited by fools, technical safeguards can be built into even the wildest story, without fear of losing reader impact” Hunter S. Thompson – Hells Angels – 1967.

You would think that in the aftermath of News of the World, journalists – especially in the U.K. – would have at least one eye on the ball. Seems not. U.K. rag Daily Mail spends bucket loads of cash on employing journalists, apparently sending them to exotic posts like Italy. Covering the Amanda Knox Appeal – Knox was found guilty of murder, her latest trial was an appeal to that verdict – one over zealous unnamed journalist filed the following headline, which was then published by the Daily Mails online portal Mail Online. Hold your breath for a rant . . .

Journalism is apparently a calling, wedged someplace between an artistic talent and a desire for notoriety, or what has come to be known as celebrity. More journalists seem to be on the opinion bent – who’s doing all the reporting – chasing a byline in print isn’t the same as bringing news to readers!? . We generalise of course, journalists aren’t a heap different to the general population. A GOOD JOURNALIST requires more than just a specific skill set. Much more important than these apparent skills – grammar, dogged perseverance, courage under fire and a nose for a story – a good journalist REQUIRES INTEGRITY, not general public integrity, but unquestionable integrity. So if your not a good journalist what happens, generally you hide the truth and hook yourself into inappropriate employment. One journalist, who would best be described as possibly the worst mother presently on this planet –  reported for child neglect and abuse, by her childs school –  runs a Child and Parenting Advice website, another covers real estate in a national newspaper as well as running their blogs, despite the fact that she’s only ever lost money in real estate.

So whats the point?

Mainstream media, is the point. In any other profession there’s a set of requirements, skills certainly, but more importantly a requirement to behave with integrity; commit a crime as a lawyer and your not likely to practice law, molest a patient and your name will no longer have Doctor at front of it. Journalists have none of these sanctions, a bad journalist simply becomes the editor for an internet site . . .

A photo journalist once said something profound on the subject of bad journalism “The problem with journalists is they think once they’ve covered a story, they’re an expert in an entire field.”

You would think that in the aftermath of News of the World, journalists – especially in the U.K. – would have at least one eye on the ball. Seems not. U.K. rag Daily Mail spends bucket loads of cash on employing journalists, apparently sending them to exotic posts like Italy. Covering the Amanda Knox Appeal – Knox was found guilty of murder, her latest trial was an appeal to that verdict – one over zealous unnamed journalist filed the following headline, which was then published by the Daily Mails online portal Mail Online.

Clearly the internet makes it possible to broadcast breaking news at a pace unlike anything we’ve ever experienced. Unfortunately, that includes the ability to rapidly transmit reports that never should have been written, much less published. Today’s case in point: the Daily Mail‘s hasty—and largely apocryphal—report that American Amanda Knox had lost her appeal of a murder conviction. Mail Online not only mistook the Italian court’s guilty verdict for slander as guilty of everything, it posted a story under the byline Nick Pisa purporting to detail the return journey of Knox and her ex-boyfriend to separate prisons where they would be put on suicide watch. The story also quotes “delighted” prosecutors who said “justice has been done.” We’ve seen stories posted in error before, particularly when advances written and stored to hop on the news are published when they shouldn’t have been. These invented details are beyond bad journalism and publishing.

The sequence of events that followed is more than amusing . . .

about an hour later . . .

picture: malcom coles


READ A BOOK! Mark Mazower

Posted: September 25th, 2011 | Author: | Filed under: Art News, Book Review, Favorite New Thought . . ., Michael Courtenay, Read A Book!, Socially Engineered | Tags: , , , , , , | Comments Off on READ A BOOK! Mark Mazower

I would normally churn through a book in a day, not skimming but reading. Mazower’s Dark Continent took 3 days and I’m now on my 3rd round, simply, I LOVE THIS BOOK. The premise is one that I’ve always found arduous to put into words: Our now perspective of history has little to do with the events that took place, the events that created what we now call history . . .

“Mark Mazower’s Dark Continent:  Europe’s Twentieth Century. Be warned, this book has the ability to become an obsession”

Mazower describes his book asDark Continent provides an alternative history of the twentieth century, one in which the triumph of democracy was anything but a forgone conclusion and fascism and communism provided rival political solutions that battled and sometimes triumphed in an effort to determine the course the continent would take. Mark Mazower strips away myths that have comforted us since World War II, revealing Europe as an entity constantly engaged in a bloody project of self-invention.  Here is a history not of inevitable victories and forward marches, but of narrow squeaks and unexpected twists, where townships boast a bronze of Mussolini on horseback one moment, only to melt it down and recast it as a pair of noble partisans the next.  Unflinching, intelligent, Dark Continent provides a provocative vision of Europe’s past, present, and future. Read the full article »»»»


Love of My Life: Danger Girl!

Posted: August 28th, 2011 | Author: | Filed under: Blip, Favorite New Thought . . ., Gaming News, Love and Other Drugs, Michael Courtenay, Read A Book!, Socially Engineered | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on Love of My Life: Danger Girl!

Love of my life...

As we get older – yes you too – stuff that we love tends to fall by the wayside – no biggy – it’s just the way life is. The stuff we do manage to hang on to tends to become treasure. Around here one of those hung-onto treasures has been Danger Girl! The comic is only 14 years old but boy it feels like we’ve loved the girls forever! Crawl out from under that rock if your clueless to the adventures of the most well drawn girls ever – sorry Suicide Girls, Abbey was here first – to be penciled onto a piece of drafting paper :: Read the full article »»»»