Level Nine Sports
 

 advertise with indeep media

Yosemite National Park Closed, Squirrels Found with Plague

Posted: August 20th, 2015 | Author: | Filed under: Blipvert, Favorite New Thought . . ., From The Web | Tags: , , , , , | Comments Off on Yosemite National Park Closed, Squirrels Found with Plague

Yosemite National Park Closed, Squirrels Found with PlagueA popular camping ground in California’s Yosemite National Park will be shut down temporarily after a pair of dead squirrels were found to be infected with the plague, officials say.

The closure of Tuolumne Meadows Campground comes a week after a child who camped elsewhere in Yosemite, one of America’s top tourist destinations, was hospitalised with the disease.

The case marked the first time a human was known to be infected with the centuries-old scourge, which is carried by rodents and the fleas that live on them, in California since 2006.

The campground will be closed from Monday through Friday of next week based on “new evidence of plague activity in animals”, Karen Smith, director of the California department of public health, said in a statement ::::

On August 6, 2015, the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) announced it is investigating a case of human plague in California and conducting an environmental evaluation in the Stanislaus National Forest, Yosemite National Park, and the surrounding areas. The department began investigating this incident after a child from Los Angeles County became ill and was hospitalized after visiting the Stanislaus National Forest and camping at Crane Flat Campground in Yosemite National Park in mid-July. No other members of the camping party reported symptoms and health officials are continuing to monitor the child’s family and treatment providers. The child is recovering.” The Park said in a statement.

A Yosemite spokeswoman said the evidence was found in two dead squirrels. The youth diagnosed with plague had camped in July at the Crane Flat Campground, 27 kilometres north-west of Yosemite Valley.

That campground was closed and treated with insecticide. It reopened briefly but has been closed for 2 weeks while authorities investigate further. The child, who was visiting the park from Los Angeles County, was said to be recovering from the illness.

Ms Smith said that despite the recent discovery of plague in Yosemite, the risk to humans remained low and visitors were being advised on how to avoid transmission of the disease.

“Although this is a rare disease, and the current risk to humans is low, eliminating the fleas is the best way to protect the public from the disease,” Ms Smith said.

Health officials told park visitors to avoid walking or camping near rodent burrows, to wear long pants tucked into boots and to spray insect repellent containing the chemical diethyltoluamide, or DEET, on socks and pant legs.

Early symptoms of plague include high fever, chills, nausea, weakness and swollen lymph nodes in the neck, armpit or groin, according to the health department.

The last reported cases of human plague in California occurred in 2005 and 2006 in Mono, Los Angeles and Kern counties, the health department said. Two people have succumbed to plague this year in Colorado, according to health officials there.

In 2012, another disease carried by rodents, called hantavirus, sickened nine people, killing three of them. Most of those cases were linked to dust from mouse droppings in tent cabins at Yosemite’s Curry Village.

California Department of Public Health Investigates Human Plague Case

Full Press Release: August 8, 2015

California Department of Public Health (CDPH) Director and State Health Officer Dr. Karen Smith today announced the department is investigating a case of human plague in California, and conducting an environmental evaluation in the Stanislaus National Forest, Yosemite National Park and the surrounding areas.

The department began investigating this incident after a child from Los Angeles County became ill and was hospitalized after visiting the Stanislaus National Forest and camping at Crane Flat Campground in Yosemite National Park in mid-July. No other members of the camping party reported symptoms and health officials are continuing to monitor the child’s family and treatment providers. The child is recovering.

Plague is an infectious bacterial disease that is carried by squirrels, chipmunks and other wild rodents and their fleas. When an infected rodent becomes sick and dies, its fleas can carry the infection to other warm-blooded animals or humans.

“Human cases of plague are rare, with the last reported human infection in California occurring in 2006,” Dr. Smith said. “Although this is a rare disease, people should protect themselves from infection by avoiding any contact with wild rodents. Never feed squirrels, chipmunks, or other rodents in picnic or campground areas, and never touch sick or dead rodents. Protect your pets from fleas and keep them away from wild animals,” Dr. Smith added.

CDPH is working closely with the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health (LACDPH), U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Yosemite National Park and the U. S. Forest Service to investigate the source of the infection, and the patient’s travel history and activities during the incubation period.

As a precaution, Yosemite National Park will provide additional information to visitors about steps to prevent plague exposure, and post caution signs at the Crane Flat campground and nearby campgrounds. Steps the public can take to avoid exposure to human plague include:

  • Never feed squirrels, chipmunks or other rodents and never touch sick or dead rodents
  • Avoid walking, hiking or camping near rodent burrows
  • Wear long pants tucked into socks or boot tops to reduce exposure to fleas
  • Spray insect repellent containing DEET on socks and pant cuffs to reduce exposure to fleas
  • Keep wild rodents out of homes, trailers, and outbuildings and away from pets.

Early symptoms of plague include high fever, chills, nausea, weakness and swollen lymph nodes in the neck, armpit or groin. People who develop these symptoms should seek immediate medical attention and notify their health care provider that they have been camping or out in the wilderness and have been exposed to rodents and fleas. Plague is treatable in its early stages with prompt diagnosis and proper antibiotic treatment. If not treated, plague can be fatal.

In California, plague-infected animals are most likely to be found in the foothills and mountains and to a lesser extent, along the coast. Desert and Central Valley areas are considered low risk for plague. State and local health officials regularly monitor plague-prone areas by testing animals and their fleas. In 2014, non-human plague activity was detected in animals in seven counties:  El Dorado, Mariposa, Modoc, Plumas, San Diego, Santa Barbara, and Sierra.

Plague is not transmitted from human to human, unless a patient with plague also has a lung infection and is coughing. There have been no known cases of human-to-human infection in California since 1924. LACDPH and CDPH believe the risk of human-to-human transmission is similarly low in this case.

The last reported cases of human plague in California occurred in 2005 and 2006 in Mono, Los Angeles and Kern counties and all three patients survived following treatment with antibiotics. Since 1970, 42 human cases of plague have been confirmed in California, of which nine were fatal.

The CDPH website has plague information, including precautions people can take to minimize their risk.

@mcsixtyfive

The Kernel

UNRELATED! Mythbuster SciBabe Reveals Her Secrets to Debunking Science Myths

Mythbuster SciBabe Reveals Her Secrets to Debunking Science MythsYvette d’Entremont — chemist, blogger, and better known on the internet as “SciBabe” — has revealed how her medical history inspired her to debunk myths masquerading as science.

In her most famous stunt, she swallows the entire contents of a bottle of homeopathic sleeping pills – 50 in all – to prove that they do not have any effect.

Alternative medicine is one of her pet subjects for debunking, along with the anti-vaccination movement, anti-genetically modified organisms campaigners and people who promote fake cancer cures.

Scibabe doesn’t deny that some people reckon  that alternative medicines like homeopathy work for them, but says they are not based on any form of scientific evidence :: Read the full article »»»»

UNRELATED! Kim Jong-un Executes 15 Top North Korean Officials

Kim Jong-un Executes 15 Top North Korean Officials
North Korean leader Kim Jong-un ordered the execution of 15 senior officials this year as punishment for challenging his authority, South Korea’s spy agency has told a closed-door parliament meeting.

A vice minister for forestry was one of the officials executed for complaining about a state policy, a member of parliament’s intelligence committee, Shin Kyung-min, quoted an unnamed National Intelligence Service official as saying.

“Excuses or reasoning doesn’t work for Kim Jong-un, and his style of rule is to push through everything, and if there’s any objection, he takes that as a challenge to authority and comes back with execution as a showcase,” Mr Shin said.

“In the four months this year, 15 senior officials are said to have been executed,” Mr Shin cited the intelligence official as saying, according to his office :: Read the full article »»»»

UNRELATED! Animal Activist Partitions Court For Chimp Rights

Animal Activist Partitions Court For Chimp Rights

An American lawyer and animal activist who is calling for primates to be recognised as people in the eyes of the law has had a breakthrough, with a New York judge agreeing to hear the case of two chimps he is representing.

The case has brought into question whether chimpanzees should be viewed as a person in the eyes of the law.

At the centre of the case are Leo and Hercules, two chimpanzees being used for biomedical experimentation at Stony Brook University in New York.

Representing them are Steve Wise, the president of the Non-Human Rights Project, an initiative working to achieve equal rights for species other than humans.

Mr Wise is arguing that Leo and Hercules are being “unlawfully detained” :: Read the full article »»»»

L9 SPORTS
source: reuters
source: nps
source: cdph
image source: nps

The material in this communication is subject to copyright under the Copyright Regulations Act – Commonwealth of Australia – Any copying or communication of this material is subject of copyright protection under the Act.

News Made For Mobile!


Comments are closed.